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Author Topic: Giant Yorkshire Pudding  (Read 399 times)

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Offline Syfunkle

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Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« on: February 22, 2016, 08:52 pm »
I've always known about Yorkshire Pudding, Mum used to do it for Sunday lunch. It wasn't until I visited a town in the north of the Lake District in the UK that I discovered Giant Yorkshire Puddings.

Essentially it's a plate sized Yorkshire Pudding, you put your dinner into it. This recipe makes 4 plate sized YP's using
18.5cm sandwich cake tins. I get best results using a Pyrex dish the same size. I recon it has more residual heat than a cake tin, starts the cooking process quicker.

Ingredients
    small amount of lard
    225 g plain flour
    0.25 tsp salt
    4 medium free-range eggs, beaten
    300 ml milk

If you're going to halve the ingredients, use 3 small eggs.

Method
Preheat the oven to 220ºC, fan 200ºC, gas 7. You can use vegetable oil instead of lard. If you're using oil, add 2 teaspoons oil to each of 4 x 18.5cm sandwich cake tins and put them in the oven to heat up. I'm sure you know your own oven. I use a fan oven, 200C is too low for my oven, I set it at 220.

If you use lard don't put it in until you fetch the dishes out to put the mixture in. If the cake tins / dishes are the right temperature, the lard will smoke. Then you know the oven's hot enough! If the lard doesn't smoke, the oven is too cool.

Whilst the oven is warming up, sift the flour and salt into a large bowl and make a well in the centre. Beat in the eggs until smooth, then gradually add the milk, beating until the mixture is smooth and free of lumps.

Pour the batter into a jug. Remove the hot cake tins from the oven and carefully pour a quarter of the batter into each tin. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the puddings are well risen and golden in colour. Turn the puddings once, at 12 to 15 minutes.

Fill the Yorkshires with your roast dinner and gravy, and serve immediately.

Offline Sir Smurf-a-Lot

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2016, 02:38 am »
YUMMY !!! :thumbsup:

Offline Etaoin

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2016, 11:09 pm »
I often make Yorkshire pudding in something like a large skillet or Pyrex circular baking dish and then cut it into pie slices to serve.

Offline Amor

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2016, 02:22 pm »
Nice ! but is it possible without eggs??
Old age, stealth and treachery will beat youth and good looks every time!"

Offline Etaoin

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2016, 03:11 pm »
No, I don't think so. It is a bread-like pudding, but if you don't have the eggs then all you get is bread.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yorkshire_pudding

Offline Syfunkle

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2016, 07:51 pm »
E S is correct. I've had several(!) Yorkshires over the years, made by many different people, all using a slightly different recipe and method. Some in restaurants, many just having gone to Sunday lunch with friends. I'm a nosy bugger when it comes to cooking. I always ask the cook, it could be either the host or the hostess, how they cooked {whatever}.*

I've posted the recipe that works best for me, for Giant Yorkshires. All the recipes I've come across use eggs.

One thing to note. It works best with lard! Traditionally beef dripping was used, when Yorkshires were first cooked, vegetable oil wasn't an option.

*I could be asking the cook because I enjoyed it and want to do the same - or it could be because I want to avoid making the same mistake ....

Offline Etaoin

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2016, 08:12 pm »
This is from Joy of Cooking by Rombauer and Becker, a classic. I can't find my own recipe, but mine ends up pouring the beef drippings over the top and giving it a modest swirl before putting it into the oven.


Offline Syfunkle

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2016, 10:10 pm »
I can buy frozen ready made Yorkshires from any of my local supermarkets. Just stick 'em in the oven for 5 .. 10 minutes and they're done. They're about cupcake size, taste like cardboard. My recipe and method is specifically about how to cook a Giant Yorkshire that tastes like a Yorkshire should.

The recipe ES posted is a traditional one - note the Beef Dripping - I've been fed this, it's extremely, and I mean extremely nice in slices / portions. Wouldn't know if it's suitable for Giant Yorkshires.

Just a note - I have some baking trays specifically for individual Yorkshires. Imagine a baking tray that is essentially for "over-sized " cupcakes, six to a tray instead of the usual 9, 10 or 12, and with a slightly different profile - you'll get the idea.

Offline Etaoin

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Re: Giant Yorkshire Pudding
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2016, 02:07 am »
I used to cook from Joy of Cooking back in the '60s-'80s before they invented this new fangled thing called the Internet. It's difficult to comprehend the dearth of information in that era, where you either got recipes from family and friends or cookbooks. Joy of Cooking would certainly go on the list of top 10 best classic cookbooks, along with Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking along with Julia's other books. I hope you have all seen Dan Akroyd's skit on SNL playing Julia. :) Becker is Rombauer's daughter and I think the first edition dates back to the '30s. It was THE BIBLE for many decades.

I first encountered Yorkshire pudding back in the early '70s when I got my first apartment and there was an English themed restaurant called Talk of the Valley (this being the San Fernando Vally, sometimes portrayed by Hollywood, and also the porn movie capital of the world in that era). Talk of the Valley served a mean prime rib roast, and I mean big and thick and juicy and rare, and with Yorkshire pudding as I described which was I died and went to heaven, then came back for another bite and died again, and yet back for more rib and pudding! OMFG those were the days!!!

I guess probably the best way to make it is if you could let the rib roast drip on the pudding but that seems impractical to me. I think the most practical way is to save the juices from one rib roast and then use them next time to make the pudding, and save that time's juices for the next.

The dough starts out sort of like a flat bread of sorts, and you swirl in the roast drippings and maybe spread it a bit so it is a bit thicker near the edge. After cooking it is never the same, there are always higher and  lower areas but the crust is by design thicker at the edges and not at all uniform, which gives a pleasing hand made appearance. I think the word is rustic!

It was only when Talk of the Valley went out of business that I started fiddling my own recipe. The way they served it, juices swirled into the batter before cooking that I thought was so delicious, and that's what I aimed to copy when I made my own. And I did succeed! It was delicious! I think a large Pyrex pie dish is the ideal vessel, and make enough to quarter it for 4 servings, or hex it so some guests can have a modest piece and people like me can have seconds! The usual dimensions were about 1 to 1-1/2 inches at the edge and a half inch or so in the middle.

I suppose a beef gravy package mix could make a second rate Yorkshire pudding that would be almost as good. I think I'll experiment with that.

OMFG that reminds me of the story of my ne'er do well friend Tom who had excellent drinking skills (mostly beer) and avoided work whenever possible (which was entirely possible considering his Bachelor of Arts degree from CSUN which qualified him for absolutely no real life job). He was working at a copy store when we met, but his parents died, and he and sis split their wealth. Over the next decade or so Tom was content to lollygag around and pretend he was looking for a job. I often paid him to do odd jobs around my house.

This one time the job was painting the (only) bathroom in my 3BR '50s house, and I promised him the best dinner he ever had after the paint was drying. I bought a 3-1/2 pound prime rib roast (2 bones) and cooked it to perfection and served it with Yorkshire pudding. My Gawd we must have each ate a pound and a quarter or more of meat (subtracting the weight of the bones). Talk about Diamond Jim Brady cut, this was fucking HUGE!!!

I miss tom. He died in his '50s or so from stomach cancer. But don't get the idea the prime rib 'n pudding was the cause. He was a notorious junk head. He never tasted a food he didn't like, fast food, nuke 'n puke, gourmet food, he didn't care, and near the end he admitted he had the impression that a better diet might have prevented his demise.

Tom was a big man, fairly fat, "Dunlop's disease" (your belly done lops over your belt) and a BIG red bushy beard almost ZZ Top category. He had a great sense of humor and his most annoying habit was when I told a joke his Hah! was so loud it hurt my ears!

These days I have to check with my bank to see if I can get a mortgage on my house in order to afford to buy a prime rib roast.